BILAL NASIR KHAN AUDIO ENGINEER, MUSIC PRODUCER & THE MASTER OF ELECTRONIC MUSIC

BILAL NASIR KHAN AUDIO ENGINEER, MUSIC PRODUCER & THE MASTER OF ELECTRONIC MUSIC

'Nobody knows what it’s meant to sound like - so don’t get stuck on a song because you think people have already heard it, be ready to make changes, don’t get complacent'

Tell us a bit about yourself and your music that you’re currently working on?

My name is Bilal and I’m an Audio Engineer and Music Producer. I make electronic music under the alias ‘Rudoh’. At the moment I’ve been working on more club oriented music like garage, breaks and Detroit inspired electro, and I’m currently in the process of starting a new vinyl label called ‘Jugaar Records’.

What first got you into music?

I got into music around the age of 17. I briefly played drums for a band called Mole, and around that time I was introduced to a software called Reason 4, and then from that day and today, I’ve been making music.

Who inspired you to make music?

Initially it was my friends who I was in a band with, but my most important inspiration came from the music scene in LA at the time. Artists like Daedalus, Flying Lotus, SAMIYAM, Ras G and GLK had a huge impact on why I wanted to create electronic music. Sounds were so bizarre and surreal, I kept wanting to learn how to make them.

How would you describe the music that you typically create?

All of it is made on a laptop using software like Ableton Live and Reason. It mainly resides in the realm of electronic music, and in that space I like to move around a lot. There are days where I make hip-hop beats, some days I like to make garage, breaks and electro, and on other days I like to make more house oriented music.

What is your creative process like?

I have two ways of going about it. Most of the time it’s making a drum pattern and then adding everything else onto it, but then there are times where I start off with a random sample I got off a vinyl, YouTube video or a sample pack. Usually it’s a set of chords, and at times I just start off playing chords and add everything else on top. Typically, I have two-three different processes but after doing them for almost a decade I feel like I need a radical change in my approach. (Laughs)

Who would you most like to collaborate with?

Someone who I’ve always wanted to collaborate with is Sanam Marvi! I’m still waiting for it; can someone please make this happen?

Do you sing in the shower? What songs?

I wouldn’t exactly say singing but I do sing random notes to find room resonances.

What would you be doing right now, if it wasn’t for your music career?

Definitely a pro-gamer or streamer.

Where have you performed? What are your favourite and least favourite venues? Do you have any upcoming shows?

I’ve performed a lot of places globally now. I think my favorite was a small bar/club in New Orleans. They kept serving me shrimp tempura during my set, honestly the best gig of my life. Least favorite gig was at some house party in Karachi, absolute nightmare, would not work with them ever again. (Laughs)

How do you feel the social media has impacted the music business?

It’s probably the best thing about being in the creative industry, that you have the ability to push your work around the globe with so much ease. It’s because of the internet I’ve travelled around playing shows in places I couldn’t have imagined to be possible. It’s not just that, I’m getting releases on labels from places like Berlin, London, Thailand and Australia! Absolutely love the internet and how it’s helped Pakistani artists get appreciated all over the world.

Which famous musicians (local and international) do you admire?

Local: Shorbanoor, Jamal Rehman, Taha Malik, Miracle Mangal, Asfandyar Khan, Sanam Marvi, and Rohail HyattInternational: Aphex Twin, Daedelus, Flying Lotus, Rudolph C, Reptant, Shedbug, and Tame Impala

What is the best advice you’ve been given?

Nobody knows what it’s meant to sound like - so don’t get stuck on a song because you think people have already heard it, be ready to make changes, don’t get complacent, keep working on it till you’re absolutely happy with it. If you can’t do that, move onto another song.

If you could change anything about Pakistan’s music industry, what would it be?

Venues, we need more and more official venues.2020 has been...Exhausting and uninspiring.

What’s next for you?

More releases.

What is one message you would give to your fans?

Thanks for all the support so far!

INTERVIEW: HELLO! PAKISTAN

PHOTOS: COURTESY BILAL NASIR KHAN